Browsing All Posts published on »May, 2010«

Felix Kubin profile (Phoenix, 5.17.10)

May 18, 2010

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For those who heard German electronics maestro Felix Kubin slice the air with fried keyboards and speed-tweaked samples at Boston’s Goethe-Institut last November, his return to the States couldn’t come soon enough. In the meantime, albums were SendSpaced, stories were sought, and Google was searched, but the man remained hard to pin down. Pop deviant? […]

John Shade Profile (Phoenix, 5.4.10)

May 18, 2010

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Folksie newcomer John Shade says that his songs are focused on identity and anonymity, but there’s also what sounds like an unraveling personal economy lurking beneath: characters steal purses, check classifieds, go it alone with “no safety net,” and generally feel like bums. Meanwhile, Shade’s chords sound down and out, and his vocals dip into […]

Jonsi Live Review (Boston Herald, 5.6.10)

May 18, 2010

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It was easy to forget there was a band on the House of Blues stage Wednesday night, what with the towering warehouse windows and craggy Transylvanian landscapes. This was a high-concept set designed for one of this year’s more ambitious projects, the solo debut of Jonsi, leader of the Icelandic band Sigur Ros. And it made for quite an unforgettable night. Jonsi - dressed in a military jacket of tattered scarves - is at the tail end of a tour in support of his solo album, “Go.” By the time he ended Wednesday’s show, the first of back-to-back nights at the House of Blues,, it felt like a swarm of angry comets had devoured the room.

Fanfarlo Live Review (Herald, 4.13.10)

May 18, 2010

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It's when they slip into theatrical 6/8 time that things fall into the predictable world of indie melodrama that's already been strip-mined by Neutral Milk Hotel and the Decemberists. The Salvation Army Band horns and oil lamp atmospherics of the stomping “I Am a Pilot” and wistful “The Walls Are Coming Down” are designed as turn-of-the-century antiques, but they might remind you more of Y2K-era college radio. Balthazar was shadowed on his right hand side by Cathy Lucas, who doubled vocal parts with beautiful harmonies, plucked fiddle strings on the dreamy ballads and strummed mandolins on the campfire tunes. She was at her most powerful while manning a lone floor tom in front of the stage lit from below, illuminating her face like a giant scary story flashlight as she pounded Celtic thuds on it and clicked bone chattering sticks on its edges. A lot of the dramatic touches seemed a bit forced, but this wasn't one of them.